Hiking Gems on the Macleay Valley Coast

Nelson Williams | Crescent Head

Crescent Head local Nelson Williams is an avid hiker who is not afraid to venture off the beaten track. As media and publicity officer for the Mid North Coast branch of National Parks Australia, Nelson regularly leads group walks to some spectacular parts of his home region.

Here are Nelson’s tips for hiking enthusiasts:

1. There’s a fantastic walk near Big Hill on Point Plomer Road that we call the Wildflower Walk

There’s a fantastic walk near Big Hill on Point Plomer Road that we call the Wildflower Walk. It’s not signposted, so ask a local for directions before trying to find it. Spring is the best time to do this walk – you’ll see flannel flowers, little orchids and lots of bird life. It’s a nice easy circuit that kids can handle, and you can finish up with a swim at Big Hill.

2. For whale watching during migration season, you can’t beat the Korogoro Track at Hat Head

For whale watching during migration season, you can’t beat the Korogoro Track at Hat Head. It’s a nice easy walk for families who will have fun looking out for dolphins, turtles and whales out from the headland.

3. We do a lot of unmarked walks along forestry trails & little-known tracks, using navigation apps

We do a lot of unmarked walks along forestry trails and little-known tracks, using navigation apps. One of our favourite walks like this starts at McGuires Crossing near Belmore River and ends at some spectacular sand dunes in Hat Head National Park. It’s an incredible place where you will find shell middens, freshwater swimming holes and plenty of steep sandhills to run or boogie board down. If you don’t want to tackle the unmarked tracks, the sandhills can also be accessed along the beach from Hungry Gate Campground.

4. There is a lovely rainforest walk at Cedar Park, west of Eungai Creek

There is a lovely rainforest walk at Cedar Park, west of Eungai Creek. I remember seeing a very large python sunning itself on a ridge here – it had clearly just digested an equally large bird!

5. We really love walking around Yarrahappini Mountain

We really love walking around Yarrahappini Mountain. Again, we use a compass or app to navigate along fire trails, starting at The Pines Picnic Area. There is also a beautiful, short, and accessible trail that follows a creek leading out from the picnic area.

6. I recommend exploring the range of smart phone navigation apps

I recommend exploring the range of smart phone navigation apps so you can get off the beaten track and discover places yourself. It’s quite easy once you get the hang of it!

7. Always let someone know where you’re going & when you expect to be back

Always let someone know where you’re going and when you expect to be back. This is my biggest safety tip.

8. Wear sensible clothes & sturdy shoes, & pack snake bite & first aid kits

Wear sensible clothes and sturdy shoes, and pack snake bite and first aid kits. Also, make sure you bring lots of water and a map or some way of navigating.

9. Join your local National Parks Branch

Join your local National Parks Branch. It’s a great way to connect with like-minded people and discover areas that you’d never be able to walk through on your own. Once you’re a member, you can join NPA walks in other areas when you’re on holidays.

10. When it comes to respecting the environment, the most important thing is to never leave rubbish behind

When it comes to respecting the environment, the most important thing is to never leave rubbish behind and don’t disturb any plants or animals. To put it simply: leave no trace!

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on email
Explore Further

Explore the Macleay Valley Coast with your Pup

How to Keep your Kiddos Happy on your Macleay Valley Coast Holiday

Getting Reel on the Macleay Valley Coast